Monday, August 31, 2020

Movable Power Chords, pt. V - Familiarity

For the last several posts I have discussed "Movable Power Chords". These are two note chords made from the root and 5th which are neither major nor minor (a result of the absence of the 3rd). Specifically, I have covered power chords which are rooted on the 6th string. 

There are several ways that students can get familiar with power chords on the guitar neck.

  1. Exercises - specified exercises designed by the teacher to help students learn power chord positions. For example, shifting between "natural" chords only (A, G, F, etc...) or accidentals (F#, G#, A#, etc...).
  2. Chord Progressions - applying I IV V progressions (such as a 12 Bar Blues) will not only help develop the ear to certain chord progressions, students will learn to navigate the neck vertically on a single string.
  3. Riffs/Songs - The teacher can make a list of riffs and/or songs which utilize specific power chords. For example, a riff that uses power chords only on the 6th string (or later 5th or 4th string).

If you know of any other ways to get students knowing their way around power chords, let me know and I'll add them to the list!


Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Moveable Power Chords, pt. IV – How they work

In the previous post I covered how to properly finger moveable power chords – two note chords comprising the root and 5th played on the bass strings. Remember power chords are neither major nor minor as they contain only the Root and 5th of the chord (omitting the 3rd) and are generally referred to as “5” chord because of it. As I posted in the first installment of this series I first introduce moveable power chords which are played on the 6th string. This month I’ll discuss one of the most wonderful aspects about the power chord which is the ability to take this single shape and move it to a different location to create a new chord!

The root (or main note) of the chord can be found in the 1st finger. For example, in an F5 chord the 1st finger plays the note “F” which is on the 1st fret of the 6th string (indicated by the white circle) – hence, an “F5” power chord. Likewise, in a “G5” the 1st finger plays the note “G” which is on the 3rd fret of the 6th string. Keep in mind as the chord pattern moves up the neck the root of the chord will remain in the 1st finger as in the “A5” chord – 1st finger plays the note “A” which is on the 5th fret of the 6th string.
 

Furthermore, make sure to note when looking at chord diagrams which are placed on higher frets, the diagram will indicate what fret the chord is played at.

Tuesday, June 30, 2020

Movable Power Chords, pt. III - Get Moving!

In the previous post I covered how to properly finger movable power chords – two note chords comprising the root and 5th played on the bass strings. Remember power chords are neither major nor minor as they contain only the Root and 5th of the chord (omitting the 3rd) and are generally referred to as “5” chord because of it. 

As I posted in the first installment of this series I introduce movable power chords to students which are played on the 6th string. This month I’ll discuss one of the most wonderful aspects about the power chord which is the ability to take this single shape and move it to a different location to create a new chord!



The root (or main note) of the chord can be found in the 1st finger. For example, in an F5 chord the 1st finger plays the note “F” which is on the 1st fret of the 6th string (indicated by the white circle) – hence, an “F5” power chord. Likewise, in a “G5” the 1st finger plays the note “G” which is on the 3rd fret of the 6th string. Keep in mind as the chord pattern moves up the neck the root of the chord will remain in the 1st finger as in the “A5” chord – 1st finger plays the note “A” which is on the 5th fret of the 6th string. Furthermore, make sure to note when looking at chord diagrams which are placed on higher frets, the diagram will indicate what fret the chord is played at.

Next time I'll discuss how to practice these chords!